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to speak is that in 1987 there were only 125 radio stations doing talk radio in america. now there are over 2,000 so you cannot tell me that lifting the fairness doctrine was the wrong thing to do. >> host: let's get into the fairness doctrine in your subtitle the new fairness doctrine expos. let's go back a little bit in time. tell us exactly what the fairness doctrine was. >> guest: the fairness doctrine was an fcc, federal communications, regulation. 1949 and was established. it was established to force broadcasters to reach out, to seek out opposing viewpoints on controversial issues. back then in 1949 there were only 2,000 radio stations in america. there were only a few fledgling television stations in america and a glimmer of hope for a television network or to. there wasn't so much media back and of course we didn't have the internet. we didn't have the diversity of media we have today so it could be argued to some degree the fairness doctrine was a fair thing back then because if he were overloaded on media with a political ideologies it could sway opinion, no question with lack of
that there is a narrative that goes along with a crummy decade which is that in the 1970s america fell away from its greatness. 1980, along comes a man on a great whitehorse, ronald reagan pulls it out and returned to greatness. that's a fairly standard take that a lot of conservative scholars used to explain the time and took the decade. my book tries to compensate both our understanding of carter and of the '70s by looking at the '70s on just as a time of decadence and disco which a definite, but also as a time of intersection. i think it was a lot of kind of soul-searching going on in the '70s. it was a time when people felt comfortable being tough on america, the films of apocalypse now, during this time, manhattan is a famous movie that jimmy carter himself jos twice at the white house during this period of time that i'm studying. and there's a real sense of humility that america has gone through a hard time through vietnam, watergate. and perhaps return to something that can never return to the kind of innocence that might once have had. i think there is a moral seriousness to the '70s that i
," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- china expresses its strong opposition. it does not like tie 1's invitation to the dollar llama. and he sailed around the road, but he is not old enough to drive. a british teenager complete the voyage. -- and he sailed around the world, but he is not old enough to drive. hello to you. bbc has discovered many cases of corruption involving iraqi security forces. the police and army are widely blamed for failing to stop the current wave of bombings. there is concern that there is endemic corruption undermining their efforts. two months ago, they took over responsibility for security in iraq as american troops pulled back. the life-and-death question now -- can they prove they are up to the job? we have this report from andrew north. >> the attack on the foreign ministry. a suicide bomber last week. seconds before it detonated it right outside. the foreign minister tells us the iraqi army, police were partly responsible. >> the iraqi security forces should have done a better job because there w
, follow me! >> hello, america. today is a very, very special day. it's president obama's birthday. he turns 48 today, which, by the way, is only 16 more years than we had czars. 16 more czars to go before his age equals total number of czars. here is the one thing tonight -- it has been an amazing life for our 44th president, and i, like the rest of america, am inspired by his story, so, i'd like to share it with you tonight. story of barack obama. it starts -- well, it starts with his parents, ann donovan, barack obama, sr. oh, sure. sure, it begins like any other classic american love story, when these two love birds met while taking a russian language class. how many of our parents met there taking russian in 1960 at the height of the cold war? i can't count the numbers that met that way. by 1961, they were married are, and later that very same year, barack obama, jr., was born. president obama so movingly called this story during a speech commemorating the anniversary of the civil rights march in selma. >> i am disturbed what happened across the country because of folks in selma,
is the day i break my diet. oh, this job. how do i work with these conditions? hello, america. i have decided, because i saw the president's town hall meeting -- oh, it was rivetting. i think i have to change my thinking around this healthcare bill, because now, all of a sudden, reputable doctors are showing up to town halls, like totally reputable doctors, like totally showing their support for obama-care. >> your name? >> we're position is that we are like so for treating preventable conditions. how will it help me as a p.d.p.? >> first of all, give her a hand, because she is a primary care physician. [applause] how long have you been practicing? >> four years. >> give her another hand! glenn: i got to tell you, that was like so awesome, she was just like, there, i mean, she was like, i'm a doctor and i have doctor-like questions. that was great, and then, finally, a town haller, without that pesky cell phone interrupting sheila. it was great. i loved how sheila was spontaneous, you know, give sheila a little loving. it was great. it was unscripted. it was almost a pure moment. sheila jacks
was with my father on this tr. for us, it was like christopher columbus' discovery of america and we discovered america for ourself. we knew manhaan a america is very different. we knew something from mark twain of the 19th century america. it was a new world and we tried to find out what it looks like. very interesting. that it is just the detail of this book. but from the oer side, my first question is why did you write this book? 50 years ago, a visit from one little country to the united states may be other leaders came here. sometimes they were eccentric. president yeltsin was more eccentric. wind khrushchev came here, he just showed the time li a contemporary politician would rather go to but larry chiao other than thenn bause part of this was my father's behavior. maybe because it was not eliminated at the time. nodid one visage but it was change. wire rope the but? >> guest: i wrote the book because i happened to stumble upon the story of your father, micki chris jeff, a trip to the united stes which is now 50 years ago but when i stumbledpon it, it was 30 or 35 years old. i
everything because they have no cars. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. it is saturday, august 29th. good morning, kate. >> good morning, bill. we're here at the jfk presidential library in boston. senator ted kennedy lies in repose behind me in this building. we're told family members at this hour are getting ready at their hotel to come here. a senate delegation will come here, as well. they will all pay their last respects. and we'll have coverage of the senator's journey to his final resting place. we'll talk to one of his nephews about his legacy. and some of his former staffers, like supreme court justice stephen breyer, who said working for ted kennedy was like a family. we know you have more, bill? >> we do. >>> we have more on that shocking story. jaycee lee dugard, held for 18 years. we're learning details of her ordeal, including reports that the neighbors voiced some concerns three years ago. but investigators never made it past the front porch. >>> and also, another story out of california. everything must go. that is, if it's government pro
charged with trading them. 150 years since the start of america's oil rush. we're now in the place where it began. >> then natural gas that is being developed in this country at this point and time may get us to energy independence. >> years after britain declared war on hitler's germany, a new exhibition reveals what went on in winston churchill's secret underground bunker. >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, midday in london, and 1:00 p.m. in berlin. the israeli prime minister is meeting german chancellor merkel. the country's share a unique history. the trip includes various reminders of the holocaust. two issues are likely to dominate today's talks. the question of the settlements in the west bank, which germany opposes, and what to do about iran, which netanyahu describes as a threat to israel. >> this is the last leg of benjamin netanyahu's four-day tour. it follows talks in london, during which time hopes were raised that there could be agreements on settlements in the west bank. israel is said to be ready to restrict construction. it may not be the comprehensive freeze that the ame
apw were black because of blood. >> oliver: the only war america lpu could we have won? >> easily, easily. >> oliver: was itúqpw>=med fromy the start? >> you wanted an advisor who would tell him what he wanted to hear. in beirut, thanks.pw next news break, bottom of the t'r?ries with oliver north"q ÷y american infantryman can't be pushed, they have to be led from tzu front. this statue called follow me úwú/es tzu spirit of the the perilous business of war on the ground. on the gr north, this is war stories. coming to you from fort coming t georgia, home of the u.s. army infantry since 1918. during the 1960's and 70's, hundreds of thousands of young@@ soldiers honed their combat skills here. but american involvement in southeast asia began years before our first air and ground combat units arrived in 1965. early in the cold war against communists, the eisenhower administration spent billions fight against ho chi minh. supported himho chi minh. when he was our ally against the japanlá Ñ in world war ii. how did the united states find itself embroiled in vietnam fighting war th
and missiles and on the heels of news that three more americans are now being held in a country america does not have a diplomatic relationship with, iran. does this pump up one dictator and embolden others? we're joined now by pedavid gern and peter brooks. david, i want to start with you. it's almost impossible to ignore the message that it's sends to north korea and others that may be on shaky ground with the u.s. the next time they have u.s. citizens in their custody they can use them as bargaining chips to talk with high-level people, rewarding bad behavior. how do they keep that from happening? >> erica, i think this has a more important message to the world, and that is that america is a country that cares about its own, it will go to great lengths, a former president will fly around the world to bring back two innocent brave americans to reunite them with their families and that individuals matter in this country. and this situation, we didn't give anything away. it's not as if there was a bargain or a negotiation. rather, we had a brutal regime that captured these two young women. a
. more than that it was a road trip across america and the 1950's it elimited what i became hooked on that i rd the clips and is the rocks a bunch of them and filed them away for futureeference. then i began to read your father's nemours and he wrote to a lot about it and his memoirs were very human, very funny he was wonderfully earth the and started to read other pele's nemours and i became the world's only khrushchev buff. i was writing for the "washington post" a few years ago and realize the 50th anniversary was coming and if i was er going to write the book, ihould do it now so i did and it is now and it is called "k blows top". the reason for the title is it is the third line of 33 line have died from the nework daily news it was denied to tour of disneyland, it "k blows top". he was not allowed to go there but we can get into that later. >> host: your book is very different because it is filled with political analysisdiscussion in trying toush this of the historic cold war and it was part of the khrushchev are in toronto and -- on to rise entourage. i was scared. [laughter]
the rewriting of america's restrictive immigration laws, drafted in the 1920s. he fought hard for the immigration and nationality act of 1965, signed by president lyndon johnson. and as america inches toward majority-minority status, with the descendants of european immigrants a declining share of the population, the face of today's america is the one kennedy's efforts helped create, for better... >> i think it is fair to say that senator kennedy was one of the architects of the america of the future. >> suarez: ... or for worse. >> the '65 act put american immigration on auto-pilot. >> suarez: by the time of the john kennedy administration, america had absorbed the huge ellis island generations of immigrants who poured in from europe from roughly 1880 to 1920. president kennedy, whose great- grandparents came to boston from ireland, supported scrapping the existing quota system that used 19th-century america's ethnic makeup as a template for letting in new arrivals, favoring europeans and effectively sealing off newcomers from the rest of the world. on the senate floor in 200
he did lives on. for his family, he was a bargain. for america, and he was the defender of a dream. -- for his family, he was of guardian. >> we look at ted kennedy's legacy as the leading liberal in washington. welcome to "bbc world news." , broadcast you our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. >> i am mike embley in london. 70% -- 17% of the vote now counted. president karzai edges against his main rival. and one of iraq's influential leaders has died in exile in tehran. >> hello. he was the best known as american politician ever to make it -- never to make it to the white house. senator kidney -- kidnapping -- center -- senator kennedy died after a yearlong battle with brain cancer. he fought for so many causes, and the tributes have flowed in from friend and foe alike. but his career was limited by self-inflicted wounds. adam brooks reports. >> the death of edward kennedy, known as ted, leads a chasm in american politics. hughes was one of the most effective politicians of the last century -- he was one of the most effective politicians of the last century. his
their loans modified. lenders such as bank of america and wells fargo are called out for not doing enough. and ten lenders have not changed a single mortgage. >>> the s.e.c. is trying to ban a form of financial trading that benefits big wall street firms at the expense of average investors. so-called flash orders allow firms with high-powered computers to essentially peak at stock orders before they are placed. the practice has allowed those companies to rake in billions of dollars. >>> pepsico has struck a deal that will help it capitalize on changing trends. it's buying its two, main bottlers for $8 million. pepsi says it will allow the company to respond more quickly. >>> and procter & gamble can say it makes the official toilet tris of the national football league. they are announcing a sponsorship deal that allows the company to add a label to products, calling them the official locker room product of the nfl. >>> a new report might have parents of newborns crying right alongside their children. government estimates that a child born today will cost $290,000 by the time they finish h
.p. morgan doing 20% of their mortgages. down towards the bottom, you have bank of america and wells fargo at 4% and 6%. host: let's put the basics backs on the table. it is called what? guest: under the umbrella of making home affordable, at the peace we are focusing on is the home affordable modification program. it is what buyers do if they are running into problems. they call their letter and say they want a hempo modifications . the servicer will figure out how much you can pay. the point is to get your monthly payments down to 31% of your income. host: how much money was set aside for this and how was it used? guest: they set aside a certain amount. there are several pieces to this. there is an incentive payment for each loan that gets modified that is successful. then there are annual payments of $1,000 as long as the lone state's current. the bar were actually gets money towards their payments going to pay down their principal. -- the bowerer actually gets money towards their payments. the servicer will reduce their payment to 38% and the government will split the difference with t
>>> good morning, america. this morning, a brand-new abc news poll show nows more than half of americans approve of president obama's health care plan. is the president about to go into gladiator mode to get it passed? >>> outrage at the heroes welcome the lockerbie bomber receives after his release. we asked, why did great britain do this? >>> storm surge. the latest on the path of the giant hurricane, bill. >>> stalled on the highway. some popular foreign cars are suddenly just shutting down in traffic. an exclusive "gma" investigation. and this morning, a recall. >>> and need more sleep? 70 million of us do. and our team here at abc puts the latest solutions to the and our team here at abc puts the latest solutions to the test. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, america. i'm diane sawyer, here with david muir this morning. robin is away. chris is away this friday, august 21st, 2009. and there's a tsunami of outrage, pours over great britain this morning. >> all of the pictures pouring in. a hero's welcome for the bomber of the lockerbie pan am flight. al
's all somehow inevitable and that the only way for america to get ahead is for places like elkhart to be left behind. you hear that argument sometime in washington. but i know and you know that the truth is exactly the opposite. i'm here because i believe our ability to recover and to prosper as a nation depends on what happens in communities just like this one. the battle for america's future will be fought and won in places like elkhart and detroit and goshen and pittsburgh, south bend, youngstown, in cities and towns across indiana and across the midwest and across the country that have been the backbone of america. it will be won by making places like elkhart what they once were and can be again, and that is centers of innovation and entrepreneurship and ingenuity and opportunity. the whirring engines of america. we can't afford to run the race at half strength or half speed. if we hope to lead this century like we did the last century, we have to create the conditions and opportunities for places like elkhart to succeed. we have to harness the potential, the innovative and cr
that it did to america's image in the world is something we're still on the way to repairing. >> although snort mccain opposes so-called enhanced interrogations, he says opening this investigation is a serious mistake because it could harm the cia's morale and effectiveness. democratic senator diane feinstein says she's horrified what she's read about the interrogation, she thinks the attorney general should have let the senate intelligence committee should have continued its own review before taking any acti action. >> thank you. brand new details tonight on two stunning crimes. in georgia, seven people found dead inside their home. cops have made an arrest, but the case is far from closed. and virginia tech students grieving as cops investigate the deaths of two teenagers. those stories after the break. if you're taking 8 extra-strength tylenol... a day on the days that you have arthritis pain, you could end up taking 4 times the number... of pills compared to aleve. choose aleve and you could start taking fewer pills. just 2 aleve have the strength... to relieve arthritis pain all day.
cronkite. he was the most trusted man in america. he was the anchor for everybody i was voted down -- for everybody. i was voted down unanimously. they said it would look bad if he turns it down. so let's go to a more mainstream politician which we did. >> wanted to take walter cronkite would take the job? >> i knew that he was very much opposed to the vietnam war. six months before that, he had come back from vietnam and immediately called me and asked to see robert kennedy. the two of them thamet. he said that the senator had to run for president and he went on to say how they could not be one. -- that it could not be one. they would not like us less. kennedy said to him that he would run for president if you would run for the senate in new york. cronkite laughed and said that he could not because he did not live in new york, he lived in connecticut. secondly, he said he was not a democrat, he was registered as an independent. i knew he had those feelings about the war and he would take it seriously. he certainly couldn't out vote anyone else like to think of. >> that was 1968. >
>>> good morning, america. breaking news. two firefighters die as they try to travel through massive wildfires in california. nearly 50,000 acres ablaze. 12,000 homes threatened. >>> our house is gone. >> are you serious? >> i'm standing right there. >> sam champion reports live on the scene. >>> house of horror. new details from inside the compound where jaycee dugard was held for 18 years. her stepfather here with us live, the latest on jaycee and her daughters. and with the two woman who helped crack the case through their mother's intuition. >>> high alert. what west point cadets are teaching all of us about avoiding swine flu. ♪ >>> why a song has sometimes what the doctor ordered. dr. mehmet oz on how to gain more sleep and gain more energy without pills. >>> we say good morning, america. closing out august, the 31st, 2009. so great to have you back. >> my time away was restful and productive. got much needed rest and on the road on assignment and share those stories in the near future. so much news. we'll begin with a half a dozen fires burning across california, the
in the route of the health care reform in america. codes of rescue are fading in typhoon-stricken taiwan 3 and 15,000 still be trapped, at least 500 dead. -- in timtyphoon-stricken taiwan. 15,000 still trapped. welcome to "bbc world news," on pbs in america and elsewhere around the world. a new brigade gets to work in afghanistan. the president pardon its five top traffickers. and theç liverpoolç and fun, singapore style. cashing in on a growing army of fans abroad. -- the liverpool anthem. hello to you. britain's national health service as a move to the center of the controversy in the u.s. over barack obama'proposeds health-care reform be and the president tries to regain. his opponents are trying to cite the british model as the way not to do it. -- barack obama's proposed health-care reform. the president tries to recover. >> president barack obama and his family said it off for another town hall-style debate on health care, but as america has wrestled with how to solve the problems with its largely insurance-based system, public systems elsewhere have been coming under fire. >> wh
of air america and dana lohse affiliated with the st. louis tea party. dana, why so much anger, mistrust and misinformation out there? we wonder, has this whole thing devovled to the point where it is unproductive but potentially dangerous? >> i don't think it can be dangerous. congress is sfonsable for setting the tone. congress hasn't allowed for discourse for one of the most important pieces of legislation in american history that is what people are reacting to. they are tired of calling their legislator and leaving a message with an aide. we are seeing people who are flocking there because they have their elected official's ear and they want to express their conditions about the health care legislation. >> ron, what about the argument, this is not organized, but a grassroots movement and deeply concerned about health care. >> that is fine to get involved and it is good to show up at a town hall meeting and have a conversation. you have to have the conversation and have the discussion. many of these people, not all, many of these people are clearly showing up to shut the conversation
-- >> it is a similar statement in town halls across america, no to socialized health care. >> the health care now are just sucks. that you have to wait six weeks for a dental appointment, have you ever seen british tea to? how can you think is good? >> how is this health care going to help hawes wen jiabao from canada and great britain are telling us -- when people from canada and great britain are telling us not to do anything? >> the reality is, it has not worked. it has made people more ill. we spend a lot of money can't -- and it gets very bad. >> there has also -- have also been tv ads forecasting british health care rationing. but there are more americans that have a more positive view. >> we do not have the chance for medical and thus repay for it. -- unless we pay for it. >> of course, a state-run health service is not even being considered by the white house. but that has not stopped u.k. citizens from being dragged into the debate. this week', the president honored stephen hawking. according to one report, the scientists would not have survived under the president's plan. stephen hawkin
viewers on pbs in america also around the globe. coming up later for you, the force of iran's feared be seeinged you militia. we have an interview with a former member. and it's farewell to a pioneer of rock music, the guitarist les paul has died. hello. the u.s. government is making its view very clear. the man serving a life sentence in a jail of the bombing of a pan am jet should not be released early. he has terminal prostate cancer. he could be freed next week on compassionate grounds. he served eight years of his sentence. the bbc correspondent allen little reported back on the disaster in 1988. he has returned to lockerbie now. >> the whole sky just lit up and it was like liquid fire started to rain down on the car. >> like an atom bomb going off. it was a terrific mushroom of flames. >> i lost my brother-in-law, my sister-in-law. >> it was mid winter, the longest night of the year. one hour into its flight. the pan am jumbo jet fell out of the cold sky, the biggest mass murder in british history. he was sentenced to life for planting the bomb is now likely to be released as e
in america. code of rescue are fadg in typhoon-stricken taiwa 3 and 15,000till be trapp, a least 500 dead. -- in timtyphoontricken taiwan. 15,000 still trapped. welcome to "bbc world news," on pbs in america and elsewre around the wld. a new brigadeets to rk in afghanistan. the presidenpardon its five p traffickers. and theç liverpoolç and fun, singapore style. cashing in on a growing my of fans abroa the liverpool anthem. hel toou. britn's national health seice as a move to the cente of the controvsy in the u.s. over barack obama'oposeds health-careeform be and the president tries to regain. his opponentare tryg tcite the brish model as theay not to do it -- barack obama's proposed health-care reform. the president tries to recover. >> president barack obama and hifamily said it off for another town hl-style debate on heth care,but as america has wrestled with how to solve theroblems with its largely insurance-based system, public systs elsewre have been comg under fire. what we need to do is comep with a iquely united way of providg health care, s i am not in favor of a canadian sys
that he is dead. >> president obama hails a surprise drop in america's jobless. we look at the global trend. flying the flag for georgia. when you're on, is a conflict edging closer? welcome to bbc. we are aired on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later for you -- just like old times. hillary clinton looks up an old friend in south africa. and the comedy crunch indeed. performers are making light of the global recession. hello to you. there are strong indications that pakistan's's most wanted man, taliban commander baitullah mehsud, has been killed. it was thought he has led al- qaeda's campaign to make pakistan ungovernable. there is no official confirmation. ed sources tell the bbc he is dead and buried. american and pakistani officials are also telling our correspondence they believe he is dead. this from our correspondent in islamabad. >> a glimpse of pakistan's most wanted man -- baitullah mehsud. his chilling message at this news conference last year was that suicide bombers were his atom bomb. he said he wanted to die for his cause. the indications are, he got his
of america's top enemies in afghanistan and pakistan. first, it is a "360" exclusive. in her first interview since her sister's return, lisa ling tonight joining us on "360" to talk about what's happened since her sister laura and her colleague, euna lee, came home from north korea. how they're re-adjusting and how euna's 4-year-old daughter hana is doing now that mommy is finally home. former president bill children securing their release. he spoke publicly about that trip for the first time today. but frankly, said very little. >> i wanted those young women to be able to come home. and i wanted our two countries to have the ability to decide where to go from here. it would be wrong for me to say any more. the young women can speak for themselves about their experiences. the pictures were worth a million words yesterday. i'm glad i could be of some help. >> pictures which seemed to capture the heart of a nation. since then, both families have been out of the public eye. tonight, though, lisa ling has been kind enough to give us a window into the moments since that plane touched down and som
presidentle candidate and my choice was walter cronkite. anchor for everybody. trusted man in america. and i was voted down unanimously. everybody said, don't be silly. he'll never accept. we'll look bad when he turns it down so. let's go to a more mainstream politician, which we did. >> why did you think walter cronkite would even take the job? >> well i knew he was very much apposed to the vietnam war because about six months before that, he had come back from vietnam and immediately called me and asked to see senator robert kennedy, and two of them met. i with us there and he began by saying senator you have to run for president because this wore has got to end and went on to say how unwinning it was. said we would win a village in the daytime and have to give it back at the night. vietnamese in the south may not like the north, but they like us less. i knew and kennedy said to him, well then i'll run for president if you run for the senate in new york and cronkite laughed and said i can't. we're closing the first place, i don't live in new york. i live in connecticut and i'm not a demo
, plus what elvis' doctor faced, later on "good morning america." >>> a panel has issued a worst-case scenario for the spine flu. the virus could infect half of the country this fall and winter. 1.8 million people could be hospitalized. they say the majority of the cases could be mild. but the virus could till up to 90,000 people. as many as 40,000 deaths occur during a typical flu season, mostly the elderly. >>> in greece, a multinational airborne assault, and minor winds have given firefighters the upper hand against fierce wildfires. 19 water-dropping planes from 4 countries battled the largest fire just outside athens. this morning, mor than 1,000 firefighters and soldiers remain on guard against any flare-ups. >>> preliminary results from afghanistan's election are due out this evening. 10% of the vote has been tallied. the candidates have accused each other of voter fraud. fine expects aren't expected until september 3rd. >>> a familiar name has surfaced as a possible contender for new york's next governor. rudy giuliani is considering a run next year. the former new york c
"america the beautiful." from here, the family will get back in the motorcade, and the hearse will make its way to arlington national cemetary for a sunset burial. >> glor: as nancy mentioned oa hill in arlington national cemetary near the graves of his brothers, john and robert, ted kennedy will be laid to rest this evening. wyatt andrews reports on how that spot was chosen. wyatt. >> reporter: jeff, good evening. it has long been ted kennedy's dream to join his brothers jack and bobby here at arlington national cemetary. but the story of how this political family came here to this military cemetery is one that began by accident. the kennedys' appreciation for arlington started when president john kennedy decided to take a random sunday drive. it was march of 1963, eight months before his assassination. >> it was a late day, a late winter day. >> reporter: according to journalist and author robert pool kennedy happened to sdrif to the cemetery and then decided to walk this hill. >> he walked to about where we are. >> reporter: as the president absorbed the view overlooking the lincoln memo
been a place of retreat and renewal for america's greatest political dynasty. now they remember a patriarch, and this town remembers a friend. sam barber sold him paintings. >> i'm going to miss him terribly. i'm speechless. >> reporter: ted kennedy's father bought a cottage here in 1928, thinking it would be good for the kids' health. three decades later, ted's brothers john and robert purchased surrounding homes, creating this three acre property simply known as the compound. john is the editor of "the last lion." >> for years of his life, this was the home. this was the one home they kept returning to. they lived in new york, massachusetts, london, england, but for john, this was his anchor. >> reporter: the brothers played their famous games of touch football on the lawn here, training for the youngest brother, a star at harvard. >> i think this was the center of his young world. so many things happened here. certainly, in times of tragedy, this is where the kennedys gathered. >> reporter: a place of mourning too many times for the kennedy clan. ted was there in 1999 when he
back at her fashion for good taste on "good morning america." >> from the vault, sushi in 1985 and a tasteful way to prepare sweet peas in 1982. >> when i was living in paris and learning cooking, my old freven chef taught me how to make big old store bought peas and they can be delicious. you start out with half a teaspoon of salt, about three cups of peas and then some lettuce leaves. those are shredded lettuce leaves. then two, three tablespoons of minced shall ots or scallions and about two tablespoons of bulleter. and a little bit of sugar. the reason for that is when you got old peas, you need a little sugar to give them that fresh taste because the sugar in old peas turns to stach. you want to make them taste sweet. >> now, this is the big prick of all. tack your hands and press the ingredients into the piece to brood them because that makes the flavor penetrate and then on to the stove and then put in just enough water to cover the peas and then put them over high heat with the cover on them, let them really boil hard. that's going to steam boil. it will take about 15 m
to a surprise drop in america's jobless. a fresh conflict in georgia edging closer? welcome to bbc world news. it is broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later for you -- just like old times. hillary clinton looks up an old friend in south africa. [inaudible] >> and the comedy crunch. performers are making light of the global recession. hello to you. ed there are strong indications that pakistan's most wanted man, taliban commander baitullah mehsud, has been killed. he is believed to be leading al- qaeda's campaign to make pakistan ungovernable. sources have said that he is killed and buried, killed in a u.s. air strike on wednesday. this is from our correspondent in as, bob -- islamabad. >> baitullah mehsud is rarely seen in public. the white house has called him "a murderous thug." >> we have clear information that so far we do not have any evidence to confirm that he is dead. there were several killed during these attacks. these are indications. >> he is accused of masterminding the assassination of former prime minister benazir bhutto, as well as dozens of other att
will get a complete update from sam champion live from the front lines later on "good morning america" or you can get the latest any time at abcnews.com. >>> former vice president dick cheney is once again on the attack over the justice department's investigation of bush era detainee interrogations. attorney general eric holder named a special prosecutor last week after a newly released report said the cia not only used waterboarding but also a gun and an electric drill to threaten terror suspects. cheney says the probe is all about politics. >> i think it's an outrageous political act that will do great damage long term to our capacity to be able to have people take on difficult jobs, make difficult decisions without having to worry about what the next administration is going to say. >> cheney also accused president obama of caving to the left wing of the democratic party for allowing the investigation to get under way. mr. obama has implied he'd prefer not to prosecute cia agents for their interrogation activities and he says he is leaving the investigation up to the attorney genera
demand from america's consumers. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning. and thanks for being with us.we violent weather, which has ravished parts of eastern texas. >> it started yesterday afternoon, in the houston area, with heavy rain, strong wind and at least one tornado. >> meanwhile, a construction worker died after rainwater flooded the tunnel he was working in. >> water came in from everywhere. they were saying. and didn't know where it was coming from. had to go in there while they were on air, breathing air. we had to have hoses in there. we didn't know what the atmosphere was. >> two men were able to escape. but a body of a third worker was found about 50 feet inside the tunnel. >>> in nearby beaumont, texas, a tornado struck without warning in a crowded shopping center, sending people running for their lives. the twister touched down outside the kohl's department store, around 2:00 tuesday afternoon, catching shoppers offguard. a worker at a nearby restaurant grabbed his cell phone, capturing this video of the twister's powerful winds. >> it went over towards walmar
children, we have exclusive >>> good morning, america. breaking news. a continental airlines jet making an emergency landing in miami after turbulence, severe turbulence injures more than two dozen people. what was it like on board? we have a live report. >>> and capture. three american students detained in iran after crossing the border during a hike. their last message, we're surrounded. >>> did michael jackson have a fourth child, exclusive video of the jackson family vacation. who is this young man always at jackson's side? >>> the newest poster person for diet and weight loss. rush limbaugh loses 90 pounds in 5 months. a new diet trend. could it work for you? >>> and the boom that went bust. we show you how not to blow up a >>> and the boom that went bust. we show you how not to blow up a building. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, america. welcome to this new week. i'm diane sawyer with robin roberts on monday, august 3rd, 2009. what could it have been like aboard that plane with that turbulence? still getting news in. >> we know it was a continental flig
. uncompensated care in america cost $43 billion. you and i pay that tax. now, -- i want to address the 47 million who do not have health care coverage, to bring them into the system and that can help lower cost by having a bigger risk pools. the second thing i want to do is having meaningful cost of health care reform. let's start with medicare. i want to close the doughnut hole on prescription drugs. i want to make sure all of our seniors have access to the medications they need and that no one in america over 55 or 65 casta make this terrible decision, to lead by a meal or the prescription drugs that i need? yew instead both the there are some specialized prescription drugs that cost a lot of money. i want to make sure a catastrophic illness does not bankrupt families in america. in our district alone, the 11th congressional district, last year, 1430 families filed for bankruptcy because of health care costs. any family in america, young or old, could be one accident or one illness away from catastrophic health care costs. capping health-care -- catastrophic costs so that the family is forced i
to add to make it workable for america's businesses and taxpayers for more than just one year. i think there's a lot more work that has to be done to get this right. having said that, we have to do something. we know the current system, the status quo is unacceptable for businesses and for people that pay for insurance. dave: the president has stated that there's some type of right-wing conspiracy, that that's the trouble in passing this health care legislation ex-said that on this radio show last week so what do you make of that assumption that there's a right-wing conspiracy when he has trouble with people in his own party like yourself? >> well, i don't think, first of all, that president obama has trouble with democrats or republicans. think we have to get a system that's workable, affordable for businesses, for individuals that pay a lot of money for health insurance for their families, and for taxpayers that collect -- picking up a very big tab for medicare and medicaid. think there are people on the left and right that have their very strong, philosophical views, of what needs
to tell you people in america no one realized income went up, millions of them. they have got money to spend. we'll tell you how they are. >> street signs, 2:00, be there. >> cnbc.com news now. >>> down market after the food company raised starting outlook for the year on better than expected sales. price line.com sales are also jumping as its earnings were also better than forecast. boeing got $1.2 billion contracts from the canadian government for 15 new chinook helicopters. cnbc news now, i'm courtney reagan. >>> good morning and welcome to the call. 90 minutes into trading on the floor, the new york stock exchange. we're watching the market trying to move its way back to the flat line, down seven points on the dow. we're going to talk about coming up in this hour whether or not the amount of consumer debt could derail a recovery in the stock market. happy monday, larry. >> thank you. i'm larry kudlow.. paul krugman going at it again. he's arguing big government saved the economy and budget deficits are good. he's calling for a second stimulus. in our call of the wild we're going
about $13 million collectively if they would go on a tour, a ten-city tour of america, and then there's an option to have some concert ins europe. >> it's very interesting. we have the graphic up here, who gets paid what. can they do this tour without janet jackson? >> well, i think it's a whole lot less valuable. janet jackson, the baby of the family, ironically now, has taken the position of michael in the family. she is the primary bread winner, as was he in his heyday. no, i think that it would be greatly diminished if janet did not join, and i'm hearing she's a little reluctant. >> she's reluctant. why would she be reluctant? >> because that puts her in the spot that her big brother michael was in all those years, which was to be the one to be pestered, let's go on concert tour. let's go on tour because we, the brothers, need money. >> right. >> i think la toya saved her money pretty well, but the brothers did not. >> right. we hear rumors that there is this sort of not particularly -- there is some serious sibling rivalry going on behind the scenes in terms of how this potential
. j. o'rourke examined america's love affair with cars which he believes has contributed to its cultural decline. the automotive museum in los angeles hosted this event, it is 45 minutes. >> i want to thank you for coming to this book signing. i am the director of the museum here. earnings is an honor for me personally as well as the museum. .. >> pretty well rounded writer and what i love most about him is his ear refer vans and the way he turns a phrase and honest to god, i twant say it, it's the truth he is by far my favorite author and i have all of his box and the first part of the book it lists all the books he has written and i think 3 or 4 of them are "new york times" best-seller books, and, if you hand read "parliament at wars" or "give war a chance" or "all the trouble in the world" read those books and what is interesting about pj and, interesting in the book, and one of my question to him later, are they going to make a movie about your book, a lot of stuff he talks about, that goes back to the '70s and '80s is as true today as it was then and you keep reading the st
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